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So You Overstayed In Ukraine–Now What REALLY Happens?

The general rule of thumb for any foreigners in Ukraine is this: you can stay 90 out of a 180 day period.

What they don’t really tell you is the “wink-wink” part of that deal.

Essentially, you can stay in Ukraine as long as you want. The only catch is that you’re going to pay a fine when you leave–895 UAH to be exact. And it can definitely be a bit of a hassle.

I went through the airport in Kiev (overstayed a month and change) last week.

I took some brief notes down:

Here was my experience.

  • Paid the 895 UAH fine.
  • Took an hour and a half.
  • Had a native girl with me, which sped it up a lot (and it was still kinda close).

Full rundown:

  • You head to passport control. They look at it. See you overstayed. Stop you.
  • Take you to a side room. Take passport from you.
  • Take ages to print out one damn paper.
  • Take said paper down to banks on the first floor.
  • Pray they aren’t on break and are willing to help you.
  • Pay fine.
  • Go back upstairs and through security (again). Cut a lot of angry people if necessary.
  • Go collect passport and turn in receipt showing you paid the fine.
  • Go through passport control (again).

Best advice? Be the first one in line at the airport for check in (only two hours before is allowed).

The good news is that once you get through the hassle, there is a nice lounge available for use!

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In any case, let us know if you’ve got questions about overstaying your Ukrainian visa below. Ukraine Living has a lot of correspondents on the ground who have done it numerous times, and we have a lot of information to share.

Read More: Cost Of A Date In Ukraine

  • October 22, 2016
Click Here to Leave a Comment Below 24 comments
Will

Hi there,

thanks for sharing your experience.
What about returning to Ukraine afterwards ? Is there a ban period or you can come back a few days later and enjoying the 90/180 rule ?

Thanks in advance.

Will

Reply
    Ukraine Living

    Seems to vary, honestly. We’ve known some people come back in the next day, and others who have waited a month.

    The best bet is to probably just wait one month–highly unlikely they won’t let you in. Hell, a friend the other week overstayed by 3 months and they just looked at him, laughed, and let him go. No fine.

    Reply
    FillSlarp

    Good post about wonderful place. I’m currently planning new journey (to Germany this time) and this information could be very helpful. Cheers.

    Reply
      Ukraine Living

      Make sure you don’t overstay AT ALL in Germany. They will not be as nice about letting you go as they are in Ukraine!

      Cheers

      Reply
Ukrainian lawyer

895 UAH fine is more than it should. The fine itself should be from 510 to 850 UAH. (Article 203, Ukrainian code of administrative offenses: http://zakon4.rada.gov.ua/laws/show/z0944-15/print1481077553240165).

However, they might also have charged you for bank transfer, a fee for a special paper and some other things.

Reply
barry

I overstayed 2 months at march 2016 exit and paid 942hryvna fine as per details described above. I am leaving on 20th march after 5 1/2 months in ukraine, will let you know the new fine.i am married this time here (6th year) and I approached authorities about extending my visa legally.but in the best soviet traditions (some things change slowly)my wife has to be dying before they will even give you a maybe. Try to do the right thing doesnt work here.easier to pay fine at airport, but yes arrive as early as possible.its a huge time waste.

Reply
    Ukraine Living

    Awesome Barry, thanks for sharing that. Please keep us all posted come March.

    Reply
Tety

Thanks for the info. I am an american living in ukraine. i overstayed my visa now for two months and planning to leave ukraine and come back again. did they ask you for explanations why you overstayed?

Reply
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Reply
Ballet Slippers

Can someone shed some light on overstaying the Visa D? I’ve scoured the internet but all I get is information on overstaying the 90/180 days rule. What is the fine for overstaying the 1 year or TRP under Visa D? Anyone?

Reply
Ballet Slippers

Can someone shed some light on overstaying the Visa D? I’ve scoured the internet but all I get is information on overstaying the 90/180 days rule. What is the fine for overstaying the 1 year (TRP) under Visa D? Anyone?

Reply
Baboo

Thanks for the post. A couple of questions if you will. Recently (7/17) I have read some scuttlebutt about the UA gov’t raising the fine to 5,000 or thereabouts. Any word on this?

Also if you please, is there a concern the immigration police will actively pursue visa delinquents? For example, is a hotel required to report such a situation and have the police been known to seek out and arrest and deport overstaying foreigners or is it like you write all wink wink?

Thank you for your time and attention.

Reply
    Ukraine Living

    Haven’t heard anything about said fine, but truly – this is not a country I’d recommend doing this all that often…

    You never know when those “rules” might be changed and you end up somewhere you don’t want to be.

    The hotel couldn’t possibly know your situation – how could they? It’s not like they have access to the border control database.

    Depends what your nationality is, too. They would probably be less likely to screw with certain nationalities.

    Reply
    David

    Source?

    Reply
Aao

Thanks for the precious infos, im algerian and i overstayed tourist visa for more than one year, do you hear a lot about banning overstayed foreigners from entering ukraine? Whats your expectations from this?
Thanks

Reply
TyKo Steamboat

I am flying out of Zhulany airport in Kyiv in 7 days…
I have overstayed for 42 days

I am flying to Rome then switching airlines.
The process at the airport is to check luggage first then go through security/immigration…. So 1.) what if I m1ss my flight & my luggage ends up on a carosel somewhere? 2.) Will I have to purchase a new flight or will the airlines make a change? 3.)My flight leaves at 5am, would it make a difference if I arrive very early to check my luggage & go through this process? 4.) has anybody gone through this at Zhulany as opposed to Boryspil?

I am getting nervous. I fly in 7 days

any info would serve me greatly & comfort me. Thanks

-TyKo

Reply
    Ukraine Living

    Zhulany probably has less English speakers, keep that in mind. I doubt the airline would refund you if you missed it.

    As far as leaving early, I’d try to be the first person in line to check luggage. You should probably find out if the banks where you pay the fine are open that early, too.

    Reply
      TyKo Steamboat

      Have you paid with hgrivna or did you pay with a card??

      It seems the currency exchange banks are closed but I don’t know where to go online to find out if the necessary immigration offices are indeed open…

      But it seems there are daily flights from Kyiv to Rome at 5am

      http://vip.iev.aero/en/pages/contacts/

      http://iev.aero/en/passengers/info/passportcontrol/

      I am quite concerned as I do not have a credit card. Cash only & the website states: “Citizens of foreign countries, who are entitled to obtain visas at border checkpoints, can pay visa fee through banking terminals using bank cards only”.

      Have you paid with hgrivna or did you pay with a card?

      http://iev.aero/en/passengers/visa-processing/

      Reply
        Ukraine Living

        Yeah, it was cash. Cash is always king in Ukraine. I’ve heard of them raising the fine so I would advise you to carry more than that.

        If you’re really concerned…just take a bus out to Poland.

        Reply
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